Morse Engineering and Construction Industries

Hiring a Septic System Installer

- Friday, September 18, 2020
Morse Engineering and Construction - Septic System Installer

If you hire a company to install a septic system, these steps would likely be taken:

Obtain permits: Before septic installation begins, the necessary permits required in your area need to be secured. The contractor you hire should do this task. If the contractor fails to do this, you could find yourself having to tear out the tanks and pay hefty fines.

Survey the field to be used: The plumber or septic contractor will perform topography surveys of the area and complete a blueprint and project plan to ensure that your new septic tank will be positioned properly. Local zoning ordinances may require the septic tank be placed a set distance from structures and/or the property line.

Excavation and site preparation: This includes bringing in sand and gravel for the leach field. Accurate site prep is essential for the system to work properly since the force of gravity provides the necessary flow.

Stub out the plumbing: The term "stubbing out" refers to having a building's plumbing in place, but capped at various points awaiting installation of fixtures. So at this stage the plumber installs the drain from the house to the septic tank, ready for connection. The pipe needs to have the correct "fall," or degree of decline over distance to use gravity. If a toilet or sink is installed in the home's basement, a sewage sump pump must be installed and piped into the main drain.

Install the septic tank: When the plumbing field is ready the septic tank is installed.

Connect the tank to the plumbing: The piping that runs from the interior plumbing system of the home out to the septic tank will be connected and sealed to prevent leaks. Any drainage pipes that are necessary to connect to a secondary drainage area to prevent excessive pooling of water will also be connected at this point. The system will be tested to ensure that it operates properly. Once all connections are completed, the septic field will be filled in to hold the tank in place and provide proper operation of the septic system.

Contact Morse Engineering and Construction for more information

Source: angieslist.com


Don't Make These Septic System Mistakes?

- Friday, September 18, 2020
Morse Engineering and Construction Industries, LLC - Septic System in Sturbridge, Fiskdale, MA

Believe it or not, your septic system needs maintenance on a regular schedule. "Out of sight, out of mind" definitely does not apply to your septic system. Just because you can't see it doesn't mean you can forget about it. Without proper maintenance, your septic system can have a breakdown — usually at the most inconvenient time.

Avoid these common mistakes and your septic system should have a long and efficient life:

1. Paper

Sure, toilet paper is made to flush down the toilet. But to protect your system, be prudent with the quantity of paper used. Toilet paper does NOT include tampons, sanitary napkins, disposable diapers or baby wipes. These items do not break down sufficiently in the septic tank and can cause clogs, resulting in possible damage.

3. Grease

Do not pour grease down the sink or any pipes leading to the septic system. Grease congeals and over time clogs pipes, builds up in the septic tank and eventually blocks drain field lines. Dispose of grease in your garbage.

4. Garbage disposal

For the sake of your septic system, forget you have one (if you do). It is too convenient to scrape all kinds of things down the disposal that absolutely should NOT end up in your septic tank — fruit and vegetable peelings and scraps, bits and pieces of bone and meat, as well as grease. These items do not break down in the natural atmosphere of the septic tank. Instead they build up and cause eventual clogging and blocking of plumbing pipes and possibly drain field lines.

5. Maintenance

Please don't wait until your septic tank is backing up to decide it is time to pump it. Just as your car requires regular maintenance to keep it running at peak performance, your septic system needs maintenance on a regular schedule as well. We recommend pumping your septic tank every 5 to 7 years, depending on how many people live in your house and how much water is used.

6. Save your money

Additives do not extend the life of your septic system. They just give a feeling of false security. Your septic system requires no additional additives to function properly.

7. Laundry

One of the wonders of modern life is the washing machine. No more going down to the river to scrub our dirty clothes with a rock. However, consider your septic system — as well as the environment — when doing your laundry. The washing machine puts out a tremendous amount of water, so try and wash full loads. Spreading your loads of laundry over several days is a good idea as well. Multiple loads on the same day may put a strain on your drain field lines.

8. Cat litter

Even though the box of cat litter says it's flushable — DON'T. Not if you have a septic tank system. Cat litter does not break down totally and will clog and build up in the septic tank and lines. The convenience is not worth the expense of a repair.

Being mindful of what goes down your plumbing lines and out into your septic system will go a long way to ensuring the efficiency and lifespan of your system.

For more information on septic systems and septic system inspections, contact Morse Engineering and Construction angieslist.com


Get a Septic Tank Inspection, Avoid Winter Disasters

- Thursday, September 03, 2020

If you have a septic tank , then you know bad things can happen if it doesn’t get cared for properly. The EPA recommends that you have your septic system professionally inspected at least every three years. You may also need to get your tank pumped. The frequency depends on your household size and how much waste you produce. Pumping needs can range from every year to every five years. It can also be influenced by climate – the further north you are, the more often your tank needs to be pumped.

You should get your tank inspected and any preventive maintenance done in the fall. The last thing you want to experience in the middle of the winter when your tank is buried under 2-3 feet of snow and the ground is frozen is a septic tank emergency. By having you septic inspected in the fall, you reduce the risk of winter septic disasters.

A professional should do the septic tank inspection. What you should do yourself is keep an eye (or nose) on your tank. Water backups and any kind of odor are an indication something is going on with your septic tank. A professional will do a full inspection, including going into the septic tank to do an internal inspection.

The inspector will check your tank for leaks, make sure it is not waterlogged, and check the condition of the tank after it has been pumped. A full professional septic inspection is necessary to make sure your septic tank is functioning at full capacity.

Contact Morse Engineering and Construction for more information about how we can help you avoid winter septic disasters and extend the life of your septic system.

Source: earthcare.us


Everything Homeowners Need to Know About Septic System Inspections

- Friday, August 21, 2020
Morse Engineering and Construction Industries - Septic System Construction

How often should you get a septic system inspection?

Experts say you should get a septic inspection every three years. But here's a dose of reality: Most homeowners never get their septic systems inspected unless there is a notable issue.

But that means homeowners get an inspection only when issues that may signal big trouble arise, such as when the toilet backs up, water takes too long to drain, or there's an actual septic system leakage. The benefit of doing an inspection every three years is to avoid major problems.

The three-year mark is also the maximum amount of time you should let your septic system go without being pumped out.

A problem caught at inspection can save you from having to replace the entire septic system. It's especially important to keep your septic system in good shape if you plan on selling. During closing, a certified inspection will be performed and you don't want any last-minute surprises.

Who should perform a septic system inspection?

You're going to want to hire a professional septic contractor for the inspection.

General home inspectors do only a limited, visual-only inspection of the septic system.

A septic contractor will look for cracks in the tank indicated by a low level of liquid, the amount of solids inside the tank using a measuring device called a "sludge judge," and possible ground contamination.

Is the home seller or buyer obligated to get an inspection?

The person who's responsible for carrying out the inspection is determined based on where you live. In Massachusetts it is the seller's responsibility to get an inspection.

Bottom line: Ask your local real estate professional about your obligation regarding the septic system inspection.

Is the seller obligated to fix any septic problems?

The responsibility to pay for septic repairs typically falls to the seller. However, repairs of any kind found at inspection are generally negotiable. Contract terms usually dictate the course of action, but sellers may have such options as doing the repairs themselves, splitting repair costs with the buyer, giving the buyer a closing credit equal to the amount of the repairs, or refusing to do anything. If an agreement on repairs isn't reached, the buyer does have the legal right to walk away from the transaction.

Don't forget about disclosure

In all states, sellers are required to disclose any known problems with a home to potential buyers. If there's a septic issue after closing that the sellers knew about, they will be liable for the entire cost of the repairs.

For that reason, it's good practice for all sellers to perform their own septic system inspection. That way, the seller is protected from any future septic issues after the closing.

For more information on a septic system inspection, contact Morse Engineering and Construction.

realtor.com


Get a Septic Tank Inspection Before Buying a Home

- Thursday, August 13, 2020
Morse Engineering and Construction - Septic Tank Inspection

If you’re considering buying a house with a septic tank, include the septic system in your home inspection. A septic inspection will give you peace of mind and prevent any costly headaches after moving in.

A septic system inspection includes the following:

  • Date of the last inspection to determine if it’s properly maintained
  • The level of sludge in the tank
  • Location of the drain field, it should not be located near the well or any body of water
  • Confirmation that the system is large enough for the home that it serves
  • Presence of liquid waste on the ground surface
  • Tank and lid are free of cracks or leaks
  • Baffles are firmly connected to inlet and outlet pipes
  • Drain lines each receive the same amount of water

For more information on a septic system inspection, contact Morse Engineering and Construction.

Source: redfin.com


The Benetits of Buying a House with a Septic Tank

Joseph Coupal - Friday, August 07, 2020
Morse Engineering and Construction Industries, LLC - Septic System in Sturbridge, Fiskdale, MA

Cost-efficient:

Living within town limits, residents pay a monthly utility bill to cover sewer costs. With a septic tank, you don’t have this recurring expense.

Self-maintaining:

With proper care, a septic system lasts for decades. Lifestyle choices like conserving water, limiting the use of bleach, and being careful about what goes down the drains, not only protects your septic but also the environment.

Safe:

In the unlikely event you have a blockage that causes waste to back up into your home, with a septic tank you know where that waste came from. On a municipal system, a back-up can bring pathogens from the entire community into your tubs, sinks, and toilets, depending on the location and severity of the backup.

Environmentally friendly:

In addition to promoting environmentally conscious behavior on the part of the homeowner, a septic system by design is an environmentally friendly home feature. If a leak were to occur, it would affect only the local property. If a leak occurs in a municipal system, the damage is more widespread.

Get a septic tank inspection before buying a house

If you’re considering buying a house with a septic tank, include the septic system in your home inspection. A septic inspection will give you peace of mind and prevent any costly headaches after moving in. A septic inspection includes the following:
  • Date of the last inspection to determine if it’s properly maintained
  • The level of sludge in the tank
  • Location of the drain field, it should not be located near the well or any body of water
  • Confirmation that the system is large enough for the home that it serves
  • Presence of liquid waste on the ground surface
  • Tank and lid are free of cracks or leaks
  • Baffles are firmly connected to inlet and outlet pipes
  • Drain lines each receive the same amount of water

For more information, contact Morse Engineering and Construction.

Source: redfin.com


Septic System FAQs

Joseph Coupal - Thursday, August 06, 2020
Morse Engineering and Construction - Septic System Inspection

How long does a septic system last? Properly maintained, a septic system should last for decades.

How often should you pump a septic tank? Have your septic system inspected and the tank pumped every three to five years. Check with your local health department to see what they recommend for your area.

What can I put in my septic tank? Hopefully, only your greywater and blackwater will go into your septic. Things like cigarette butts, diapers and wipes, sanitary products, paper products other than toilet paper, or a high level of cleaning products that will destroy the healthy bacteria in the tank should never be flushed or sent down the drain.

Do they need to dig up my lawn to pump my septic tank? If your tank doesn’t have an exposed lid, yes, they’ll have to remove the grass to access it. Though this will only be a small section of your yard and not the entire thing.

Does my septic need additives like Rid-X? No. A well-maintained system has everything it needs to break down the solids and create a healthy septic flora. However, seasonal homes may not get enough solid waste to produce the microbes needed for a healthy system. Only then, do experts recommend the use of additives in your septic tank. Check with your local septic tank servicer to find out their recommendations for your home.

Can I plant anything over my drain field? Yes, but be careful. The root systems of trees and shrubs can damage the underground pipes. Vegetable gardens could also become contaminated from the drainage. However, landscaping over and around a septic drain field with native plants is an appropriate use of the space. For more information on septic system inspections, contact Morse Engineering and Construction.

Source: redfin.com


Should I Buy a Home with a Septic Tank?

Joseph Coupal - Thursday, July 23, 2020
Morse Engineering and Construction - Septic Tank Inspection

What Are the Signs of a Failing Septic Tank?Besides pumping, septic tank inspections should be done regularly to check for leaks or clogs. Red flags that the system may have a clog include occasional bad odors and slowly draining or gurgling fixtures.

What About Maintenance Costs?

Septic system maintenance costs depend on the tank and drainfield sizes, tank accessibility, and how far away waste must be hauled for disposal. Pumping a tank might cost between $250 to $500. Know your state’s rules. Some require a septic system inspection before a title transfer. But even if your state doesn’t require an inspection, your lender might. (Conventional home inspections typically don’t include an inspection of a septic system).

According to Zillow, an inspection can detail the system’s condition, determine if it’s sited a proper distance from a well (to avoid contamination), and can confirm the absence of invasive tree roots in the drainfield, which may damage the system.

Also, know the age of the system. Prices can vary widely if you do have to replace a system. A conventional system may cost between $3,000 and $7,000, but that an alternative system may cost even more.

Owning a home with a septic tank doesn’t have to be scary. With the proper maintenance and care, you can enjoy your house for years to come.

For more information, contact Morse Engineering and Construction.

Source: allstate.com


Should You Buy a Home with a Septic System or Municipal Sewer Line?

Joseph Coupal - Tuesday, July 21, 2020
Morse Engineering and Construction Industries, LLC - Septic System in Sturbridge, Fiskdale, MA

Curious about getting a house with a septic tank or water well? Here’s what you need to know. Homebuyers deciding between a rural homestead and city living often have to consider where their water utilities will originate. Do they want to live off a well and/or a septic system? Or would they rather plug into a municipal water and sewer line if either are available?

A common question is "which is better?" The answer is that it’s not a matter of one being better than the other. In some instances there simply isn’t a choice — municipal water and sewer aren’t available.

If you do have a choice, understanding how each system works, and the pros and cons of a septic system versus city utilities can go a long way in helping you decide.

Have the septic system inspected

If you’re buying a house with a septic tank, know your state’s laws. Some require a septic inspection before a title transfer, but even if your state doesn’t, your lender might. This will be an additional cost for the buyer, as traditional home inspections don’t include a septic system.

If you are buying a house with a septic system, it is recommended that you open the tank and have a full visual inspection. Find out if it’s full of solids or is there evidence that it’s been flooded?

A basic inspection, includes probing the drain field. Probing the drain field (also called a leach field) is necessary to determine the layout of the drainage pipes below ground and the saturation level of the soil. If there are excessive wet areas, there could be a problem.

The inspection might also include a dye test, in which a fluorescent dye is injected into the system to determine if sewage is leaking. Pros and cons of a septic system h3

If “no monthly sewer bill” popped into your mind as the biggest asset to having a septic system, hold your horses. Many buyers want septic so as to avoid having sewer bills. And while it’s easy to understand this thought process, they don’t understand that there are expenses they need to consider.

Pumping out the septic tank is required to remove the sludge and scum that accumulates. How often it’s pumped is determined by the tank size and how many people live in the home.

Most tanks are 1,000 gallons for a three-bedroom house or smaller, which would average $265 to pump. A four-bedroom house or larger might require a 1,500-gallon tank, which would cost $320 to pump.

It is usually recommended you clean out your system every three to five years, but it’s going to be different depending on your local water tables and local codes. Contact your local health department for their recommendation.

Have the septic system checked by a reputable company before purchasing the property and then remember to take care of it over the years. Septics will serve you faithfully for years if you take care of the basics. For more information, contact Morse Engineering and Construction.

Source: angieslist.com


A Complete Septic System Installation Checklist

Joseph Coupal - Thursday, July 09, 2020
Morse Engineering and Construction Industries - Septic System Construction Fiskdale, MA

Did you know septic systems are still in use in almost a third of all homes in the United States? Many rural areas and some suburban areas do not have access to sewer, so new septic system construction and system repairs must be done to maintain a wastewater treatment system for the home and property.

Septic system installations can become tricky when there are a lot of variables, such as building a new home or replacing a system during a home sale. Below is our ultimate checklist with insider tips for a homeowner undergoing a septic system installation.

1. Learn state septic regulations

In most states, the government regulates septic system installations through local county and state laws. Many states will regulate septic systems and wastewater through their state environmental agency or a health department. In Massachusetts it is the Department of Environmental Protection (DEP).

Search their website for septic system information. Many will have a whole section with information geared towards septic system owners that will give you maintenance information as well as repair and installation information.

2. Check out what septic system permits are required

Permits vary from state to state. A thorough search of the local agency’s website should tell you what permits are required in different situations and direct you to those applications. Some states also have laws that allow certain systems to be grandfathered in or exempt from needing a permit.

In some cases a property will need to be evaluated before getting an installation permit, so the local agency can determine the type of system that fits the property’s soil condition best.

And in a worst-case scenario, a few states and local rules are vague, leaving the homeowner unsure of what can be installed and how. In situations like this, we recommend choosing a local septic contractor with a good reputation — online and offline — to help you navigate the state laws.

Insider tip: Permitting and application review can take awhile, especially during summer months. We recommend planning four to six weeks ahead and asking the local agency that reviews permit applications about their current review time.

For more information, contact Morse Engineering and Construction.

Source: angieslist.com