Morse Engineering and Construction Industries

Benefits of Hiring a Snow Plow Service

Joseph Coupal - Thursday, January 23, 2020
Morse Engineering and Construction Industries - Snow Plow Service

A snow plow service, like many things in life, is often assumed more expensive than it really is. A big snow storm can often have you regretting you have not hired a snow plow service.

When you consider all the risk that is mitigated by hiring a professional to remove snow, you may even see the investment not only saves you head and back aches, but money as well.

There are many benefits to engaging a snow removal service:

Safety

Business – Keep your employees and patrons safe from slip and fall type accidents. Not only is it the right thing to do, but it protects you from costly litigation. You will also save time and money avoiding absent and injured employees.

Personal – If you have young children or care for an elderly family member, a clear pathway from the vehicle to the entryway of your home is essential to their safety.

Protect Your Investment

Did you know that different types of snow plow blades are more effective than others? If an old, dull plow edge of inferior quality is used, it can damage the asphalt in your parking lot or driveway. Hiring someone who knows all things snow plow is your best bet.

Avoid Fines

Many communities have ordinances requiring both business and residential sidewalks to be clear at all times. This can be hard to keep up with on your own with other full-time commitments.

Sleep

This one is easy to get behind… You get to stay in bed! Let someone else be responsible to greet the new day while they brave the cold. Start your day right with the routine that makes you most effective, without a flash snowfall putting a kink in your style.

You may find once you interview service providers that there is flexibility of seasonal packages and hiring help on an as-needed basis.

For more information, contact Morse Engineering and Construction.

Source: getassist.com


Don't Let Your Septic System Freeze

Joseph Coupal - Friday, January 17, 2020
Morse Engineering and Construction Industries - Septic System Construction

Lack of snow cover and dropping temperatures can spell trouble for homeowners with septic systems.

Snow helps to insulate septic systems and keep them from freezing. Unfortunately, a lot of our snow cover has melted and temperatures across the state are dropping.

Below is a list of seasonal tips for homeowners on how to prevent septic system freeze-ups as the winter season progresses.

  • Place a layer of mulch 8 to 12 inches thick over the pipes, tank, and soil treatment system to provide extra insulation. This can be straw, leaves, hay or other loose material that will stay in place and not become compacted. This is particularly important for new systems that were installed so late in the year that vegetative cover didn't get established. However, if the system is currently frozen, don’t add mulch now; it will delay thawing in the spring.
  • Use water—the warmer the better—if you’re worried your system is starting to freeze. Spread out your laundry schedule so you run one warm/hot load a day. Use the dishwasher and take hot baths. Do not leave water running all the time—this will overload the septic system.
  • Going away for an extended period? Have someone use warm water in the home regularly or pump out your tank before leaving.
  • Fix any leaky plumbing fixtures or appliances in your home. This will help prevent freezing problems and help your system perform better all year.
  • Keep all vehicle, animal, and people traffic off the system. This is a rule to follow all year as compacted snow and soils cause frost to go down deeper and faster. Pay special attention to the area between the house and tank.
  • Keep an eye on your system. If any seeping or ponding occurs, contact an onsite professional to help determine the cause and remedy.

Add more insulation to your system. This could include replacing pipe with insulated pipe, adding expanded foam panels over septic tanks, or adding more soil cover.

For more information, contact Morse Engineering and Construction.

www.pca.state.mn.us


Soil Evaluation and Septic System Site Q& A

Joseph Coupal - Friday, January 10, 2020
Morse Engineering and Construction Industries, LLC - Septic System in Sturbridge, Fiskdale, MA

My site and soil evaluation is complete. What’s next?

In order to get a permit to install a wastewater treatment system, a layout/design plan must be completed and submitted with the site/soil evaluation report. Based on the soil evaluation report, a layout/design plan must be completed by someone with knowledge of septic system components and local and state health department rules. Roxsol has completed multiple layout/design plans for homeowners and commercial clients. Experienced system installers can also complete the layout plan.

Why do I have to have a site and soil evaluation completed?

New state and local health department rules require that a site and soil evaluation be completed prior to installing a new or, in some cases, a revised septic system. By reviewing and documenting the site and soil conditions, a septic system can be designed to maximize the life expectancy of the installed system.

How do I choose a good home/commercial site?

Finding a good site to build on is a challenge. New septic system rules require that there is leach area available to accommodate a primary AND secondary leach area. Primary area is defined as the area that will be used for the initial system leach area. The secondary leach area is only used if the primary area fails. Most sites will accommodate a wastewater treatment system of some kind, but costs can vary significantly. An ideal site has at least 150’ of available length along the contour, no seasonal or apparent water table, depth to bedrock is greater than 60 inches, no excavation or overhead hazards, slopes less than 15% and15% to 27% clay content in soils. Acreage of 2 or more is usually sufficient to accommodate a residence and the required leach area.

For more information, contact Morse Engineering and Construction.


Merry Christmas and Happy Chanukah to You and Yours this Season

Joseph Coupal - Saturday, December 21, 2019
Morse Engineering and Construction Industries, Fiskdale, MA

Christmas and Chanukah share a similar spiritual message: that it is possible to bring light and hope into the world. These two holidays occur together this year, which makes this an even more special holiday season.

This is a season to reflect upon how fortunate we are to have you as our customers: our friends and neighbors. During these holidays, we wish you, your family, and your friends a safe, joy-filled, and relaxing season.

Warm wishes for a Happy Hanukkah, a Merry Christmas, and a most Happy New Year! With peace, joy, and love this holiday season and beyond!


5 Tips for Septic System Maintenance in Winter

Joseph Coupal - Thursday, December 19, 2019
Morse Engineering and Construction Industries - Septic System Construction

There is never a good time for a septic system problem especially during the cold winter months. Here are tips that can help you and your customers keep the septic system in top working order.

  1. Pump the septic tank. If necessary the tank should be pumped prior to the winter season to eliminate accumulated solids.
  2. Inspect the system before the first snow and ice arrive. Inspecting the tank prior to the cycle of freezing and thawing can detect any cracks or issues that should be corrected. Also, inspect the drainfield to ensure that there is no surfacing effluent, wet areas or spongy soil above the drainfield.
  3. Inspect the plant cover on new systems. Systems installed in the fall may not have enough vegetative cover to properly insulate the system to prevent winter freezing. Placing a good layer of mulch or dry soil over the system is an important preventative measure.
  4. Winterize vacation home plumbing. Septic systems require usage to minimize the risk of freezing. If the home is a vacation property that is not used regularly during the winter, the septic tank should be pumped prior to the first frost and the home’s pipes should be winterized and drained.
  5. Avoid snow compaction and placing structures over the drainfield. Although snow is a good insulator, compacted snow is not as effective. Homeowners should avoid driving over the drainfield, even in winter, and structures should never be placed on top of the system.

For more information, contact Morse Engineering and Construction.

Source: infiltratorwater.com


Winter Septic System Maintenance Tips

Joseph Coupal - Thursday, December 12, 2019
Morse Engineering and Construction Industries - Septic System Construction

If you have a septic system, it’s important to know what you should and shouldn’t do around that area of the yard and indoors. There is a possibility of a septic system freezing, especially in cold areas with little snowfall. Follow these tips to reduce the chance of frustrating and costly damage to your septic system this winter.

Repair leaky fixtures. Dripping sinks, showers, and toilets can result in ice forming in the pipeline between your house and septic tank.

Use hot water. Having warm water flow into the tank regularly will help prevent ice buildup. Pamper yourself with a long bath or shower with the knowledge that you’re helping the septic system!

Keep up the lawn. A healthy, thick lawn of grass or other foliage will help insulate the soil that contains the septic system.

Spread mulch. Place an 8-12 inch layer of straw mulch on top of and around the pipes, tanks, and drain field of the septic system. This will further insulate the ground and help prevent the soil from freezing.

Secure the system. Make sure the tank and pipes don’t have any cracks in them and any caps are still securely in place. Any openings can let cold air into the system.

Keep cars away. Never park any vehicles on top of your drain field. Cars will compact the soil above the septic system, which makes it easier to transfer cold below. They will also prevent insulating snow from covering the area.

If you’ve had troubles with your septic system freezing or other issues in the past, you should get the system checked out by a professional. They can help with problems such as:

Sagging pipes. Pipes that have settled into the ground unevenly will cause water to pool and possibly freeze.

Insulation installation. A sewer professional can install more extensive insulation around the tank and pipes.

Draining the system. A septic tank and pipes periodically need to be pumped and cleaned out. You should leave this task to a professional.

Waterlogged drain field. Older septic systems can cause the drain field to become flooded. In this case, consult with a professional to see what can be done in your particular situation.

Keep your septic system in good shape by getting it checked regularly. In the meantime, keep these tips in mind to help prevent freezing and damage. If you want more home maintenance tips for the colder months.

For more information, contact Morse Engineering and Construction.

Source: completehomewarranty.com


Now is the Time for Us to Say "Thanks" to YOU!

Joseph Coupal - Wednesday, November 27, 2019
Morse Engineering and Construction Industries, LLC - Fiskdale. Sturbridge, MA

Thanksgiving Day is the perfect time to remind one another of the many reasons there are to be grateful. We gather on this day to be thankful for what we have, for the family we love, the friends we cherish, the success we have had, and for the blessings that will come.

Thanksgiving is more than the festivities, it gives us time to ponder the lessons that we have learned and how we can spread happiness around, to look back at all the great memories and good people who came into our lives. We appreciate you, our customers and clients, so much.

At this time of year our thoughts turn gratefully to you with warm appreciation. Our best wishes for a Happy Thanksgiving.


How Much Do Septic Tanks Cost?

Joseph Coupal - Friday, November 22, 2019
Morse Engineering and Construction - Septic System

How much do septic tanks cost? Septic tank installation costs can head up into the tens of thousands of dollars, but if you're thinking of buying or building a home in a rural area or some other place that's not connected to a public sewer system, you may just have to spend the cash. Installing your own septic tank means the water going down the drain of your bathtub, toilet, and sinks has someplace to go!

In fact, about one-third of Americans have their own septic system. If you're breaking ground on a new home or converting a cabin with no running water, you will have to install one. But how much does a septic tank installation cost?

How much do septic tanks cost?

For a three-bedroom home, you can expect to need a 1,000-gallon tank, which will range in price from $8,000 to $15,000, according to AngiesList.com. For a five-bedroom home, you'll probably need a 1,500-gallon tank, which will cost between $15,000 and $25,000.

The cost of a septic system depends on its size, and its size will hinge on how much water you use. You can estimate both of these by using the number of bedrooms in your house as a rule of thumb.

In addition to the septic tank installation cost, you will also be on the hook for a few other expenses—namely permits, soil tests, and the excavation equipment needed to dig the hole in your yard where the tank will be placed.

A local septic installation expert will have an estimate of those costs, which vary widely by area. As part of that cost, An engineer will come out and perform all the necessary tests and design a system that will work for the home.

Installing a septic system typically takes about three to five days—and ideally should be done after your home has been built but before you've installed a driveway or other landscaping features. Note: A septic tank will displace a decent amount of dirt onto your lawn, which you can use elsewhere.

For more information, contact Morse Engineering and Construction.

realtor.com


Septic Tank Pumping in the Winter

Joseph Coupal - Friday, November 08, 2019
Morse Engineering and Construction Industries - Septic System Construction Fiskdale, MA

With the weather continuing to get colder and winter not too far off, many residents are wondering whether it’s possible to schedule a septic tank pumping visit during the coldest season. While the short answer is yes, the situation requires a bit more of an explanation.

It is possible to conduct a septic tank pumping at any time of the year, no matter how cold it is. However, winter often presents a challenge not to the actual pump, but to the technician’s ability to access your home. Big snowstorms can make the roads treacherous to drive on, so they must be clear before service can be delivered. Additionally, the technicians must be able to make their way to your septic tank from where they park on your property. To carve out a path, you may have to do some shoveling, or you can wait until the snow melts. In any event, because of these winter weather issues, it’s ideal to schedule your septic tank cleaning before any storm hits.

While the cold won’t limit your septic tank pumping capability, it’s important to note it can stop a full-scale replacement of your septic system. Since that would entail more intensive excavation work, it can be problematic to proceed when the ground is frozen. Those types of projects are best undertaken during the warmer months of the year. When it comes to septic inspections, many residents also tend to pick a warm month for their annual visit for the same accessibility issue mentioned before. On the other hand, winter is a less busy time for septic companies, so you may have an easier time getting an appointment.

For more information, contact Morse Engineering and Construction.

nearsay.com


How To Find My Property Lines?

Joseph Coupal - Thursday, October 31, 2019
Morse Engineering and Construction - Septic System Inspection

When you look at your house and yard, you're fairly confident you know your property lines. The neighbor's fence and where you mow your grass all seem to match the boundaries between other houses on your street. A fence here and there may slightly stray into someone else's yard, but for the most part everything seems about right.

Now imagine being so wrong about your property lines that your house is built on the completely wrong lot.

It’s happened before.

Much smaller mistakes, or discrepancies between documents, can lead to costly issues if you and a neighbor disagree over the location of your property line, whether it's a couple inches or a couple yards. To steer clear of conflicts, avoid making any changes to the edges of your property that could lead to a problem, monetary or otherwise, down the line.

Why You Must Know Your Property Lines

From permits to purchases, being able to identify your property lines accurately makes it much easier to complete a project or move forward with a transaction.

In most official cases, having a new survey done is the way to go. If you want to build a swimming pool, and you're not 100 percent sure where that easement is. You could have a new survey done.

Additionally, when you purchase a home, it's not uncommon for your mortgage lender to require a new survey be conducted on the property. Even when that's not the case, your title insurance company will likely recommend a new survey as well, so you know if the neighbor's garage reaches over onto the property or if the outdoor kitchen encroaches on a sewer easement, which could be costly to remove down the line.

Issues discovered in the new survey of the property may not be covered in the standard owner’s title insurance policy, but knowing those concerns before you close could help you decide if you need to renegotiate with the seller or walk away from the deal entirely.

How Do I Find My Property Lines?

Your property lines were established when your neighborhood was originally developed. The property lines are noted in a couple different locations, including in the legal description for the lot, which would be on your property deed, and on a plat map, which is typically available through your local assessor's office or planning office.

But being able to perfectly translate the legal description to establish the physical boundaries on your property can be quite the feat if you’re not trained to do so. Many properties have hidden markers at the corners that, if found, can help you find your bounds, though hiring a professional surveyor to reestablish your property lines will give you the most accurate answer.

Here are your options for finding your property lines:

Hiring a Surveyor

For existing residential properties, a surveyor specializes in making precise measurements to locate the legal boundaries of a plot of land and any improvements to the property, from the house and driveway to a swimming pool or backyard shed. Surveyors also play a vital role when developing land to determine new property lines, locate the property location of a building to meet zoning and code requirements and more.

Taking the details from the legal description and plat map, a surveyor carefully measures the legal boundaries of your property. When the original survey is completed, metal bars are often buried at the corner points of the property. To help you see the corners or boundary lines, a surveyor will likely leave wooden stakes or flags in the ground at those spots as a temporary reference for you.

The complexity of a survey depends entirely on the geography of the area, what's on your property and what surrounds it.

Hiring a surveyor is certainly the most accurate way to find out your property lines

Required or not, have a new survey done – or refer to one conducted in the last few years – as a way to play it safe when buying a property and doing home improvements. Otherwise, you could find that you need to pay to remove an addition to your house or take out a swimming pool because it encroaches on the neighbor's land or is going to be a part of planned road expansion. Those fixes are going to be problematic, and they're going to be costly.

For more information, contact Morse Engineering and Construction.

Source: realestate.usnews.com